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GENERAL NC ELECTION INFORMATION
Election Information

The North Carolina State Board of Elections aids counties in administering election events across the state every year. These elections can be broadly divided into two categories: Statewide general elections (often simply called "general elections") and municipal elections. As stipulated by N.C. General Statute §163-1(c), statewide general elections occur in even-numbered years, are held on the Tuesday following the first Monday in November.

Municipal elections, dates, and procedures are outlined in Article 23 and Article 24 of N.C. General Statute §163. Most municipal elections occur in odd-numbered years, however some are conducted during even-numbered years. Municipalities are allowed some latitude in planning their elections; as such, North Carolina provides for four different methods of municipal election. The date of the election for these municipalities depends on the municipal election type and whether their election is held during an odd or even year.
Statewide General Elections

Statewide general elections take place every two years on the Tuesday following the first Monday of November. This means that they can occur as early as November 2 or as late as November 8, depending on when the first Monday falls. Statewide general elections always occur in even-numbered years. Notably, every other statewide general election has the office of President of the United States on the ballot.

Although the presidency is the most notable contest voted on during statewide general elections, the North Carolina General Statutes outline other national, state, and county offices to be voted on during a statewide general election. Those offices are:

 Office

 Term Length

United States Senator

6 years

United States Representative

2 years

Governor

4 years

Lieutenant Governor

4 years

Secretary of State

4 years

State Auditor

4 years

State Treasurer

4 years

Superintendent of Public Instruction

4 years

Attorney General

4 years

Commissioner of Agriculture

4 years

Commissioner of Labor

4 years

Commissioner of Insurance

4 years

All other state officers whose terms last four years.

4 years

All other state officers whose terms are not specified by law.

2 years

 Office

 Term Length

North Carolina State Senator

2 years

North Carolina State Representative

2 years

Appellate Court Judge

8 years

Superior Court Judge

8 years

District Court Judge

4 years

District Attorney

4 years

County Commissioner

2 years

Clerk of Superior Court

4 years

Register of Deeds

4 years

Sheriff

4 years

Coroner

4 years

County Treasurer (Only elected in certain counties)

2 years

All other elected county officials

2 years

Municipal Elections

During odd-numbered years (so as to alternate with statewide general elections) most municipal elections are held to elect the governing officials (mayor, city council, town council, etc.) of cities, villages and towns across North Carolina. Not all municipalities will have an election in a given odd-numbered year. A few municipalities elect their officials in even-numbered years. Although municipal elections are conducted by county boards of election, only residents of the municipality are qualified to vote in the election. These voters must have resided in the municipality for at least 30 days prior to the date of the election.

North Carolina law allows for four different types of municipal election methods. These four methods have been outlined by the North Carolina Legislature in Chapter 163, Article 24 of the North Carolina General Statutes. A municipality's chosen method of election is codified in their charter, but must be one of the four types outlined by the State in order to comply with state law. 

Election Method

Description

Governing Statute

 

1

Partisan primary and election method

This method is similar to the primary and statewide general election held in North Carolina during even-numbered years. If more candidates file for a party nomination than the number of seats for that contest, then these candidates must compete in a partisan primary election that is held in September. If there is no clear winner in a primary contest, there may need to be a second primary for the contest that will be held in October. The general election (with one candidate from each party on the ballot) is then held in November.

N.C. General Statute §163-291

2

Nonpartisan primary and election method

These contests are non-partisan, which means that each candidate’s party affiliation will not be printed on the ballot. If the number of candidates for the contest is greater than twice the number of seats to be elected, there will be a primary election. The primary will trim the number of candidates down to twice the number of seats. For example, if there are 7 candidates running for 2 seats, the top 4 vote-getters in the primary would advance to the general election. If needed, the primary would occur in October before the general election in November.

N.C. General Statute §163-294

3

Nonpartisan plurality method

This is the most common municipal election method. All candidates for a position are listed on the ballot, without party affiliation. The top vote-getters are elected, regardless of whether or not they received a majority. If the contest is for more than one seat, the person or persons receiving the next-highest vote totals are also elected. For example, if there are 7 candidates running for 2 seats, the candidates that finish first and second are elected.

N.C. General Statute §163-292

4

Nonpartistan election and runoff method

This method is largely the same as the nonpartisan plurality method, with one important distinction. If a winner in these elections does not receive a majority (50%+1) of the votes, the candidate who came in second is allowed to ask for a runoff. In these runoff elections, all candidates are eliminated except the plurality winner and the runner-up. Those two then run head-to-head in the runoff, with the winner being given the seat.

N.C. General Statute §163-293

UPDATE UPDATE UPDATE UPDATE UPDATE UPDATE UPDATE UPDATE UPDATE UPDATE UPDATE

[No special NC elections this year; judges order quick drawing of maps to correct unconstitutional gerrymanders]
Gerrymandering, the courts and the next election in North Carolina: 
All of your burning questions answered below via North Carolina Policy Watch.
NCSBE ELECTION RESULTS NOVEMBER 8, 2016

governor-roy-cooperRoy Cooper was sworn in as the Governor of the state of North Carolina minutes after midnight on January 1, 2017.
The former attorney general took the oath of office in the Old House Chamber of the Tar Heel state's capitol building in Raleigh. Cooper was accompanied by family and close friends in the small ceremony, including his wife and daughters. Learn more about Roy Cooper...Wikipedia.Org Roy Cooper


Supreme Court strikes down STRIKES DOWN!!!! North Carolina congressional district maps 
                                                                    Information taken from the NCSBE website
RECENT DEVELOPMENT PHOTO ID, SAME-DAY REGISTRATION, OUT-OF-PRECINCT VOTING, & PREREGISTRATION
On July 29, a panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit struck down photo ID requirements and other elections procedures enacted under S.L. 2013-381 and amended by S.L. 2015-103.  Barring any alternative outcome on appeal, the following are no longer enforceable:
  • Photo ID requirement contained in Part 2 of Session Law 2013-381, as amended by Session Law 2015-103;
  • Removal of preregistration contained in Part 12 of Session Law 2013-381;
  • Elimination of same-day registration contained in Part 16 of Session Law 2013-381;
  • Changes to early voting contained in Part 25 of Session Law 2013-381; and
  • Elimination of out-of-precinct voting contained in Part 49 of Session Law 2013-381.
                                   The district court order is available here. Please check back at this website for updates as they become available.
                                             TO REVIEW THIS AND ANY RELATED FUTURE CHANGE CLICK HERE...ncsbe.gov/#newsroom                   
A Look At The June 7th Primary Results In NC
NC_Primary_Results_June-7-16
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NORTH CAROLINA LEGISLATIVE INFORMATION